Green growth, as National Coalition Party tops Euro Parliament poll

There were ups and downs for Finland's political parties in the EU election, but the Greens picked up one extra MEP seat.

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Green MEPs Ville Niinistö (L), Heidi Hautala (C) with party chair Pekka Haavisto (R), 26th May 2019 / Credit: Ville Niinistö Twitter

Finland’s Greens have picked up one extra seat and grown their share of the vote by 6.7% to come second in the European Parliament elections.

The National Coalition Party was always predicted to retain its three seats in Brussels, and they did that with 20.8% of the vote – the biggest percentage, but down slightly from the last EU election five years ago.

With 100% of the votes counted, turnout was 42.7% which is up 3.6% from the last Euro elections.

Of the 13 Finnish MEPs, six of them are newly elected.

Green wave 

The big boost for the Greens comes after a solid general election results for them in April which saw the party pick up five seats and win a place in the next coalition government.

“The Greens are Finland’s second largest European party” says Ville Niinistö, the former Green party chair, and newly elected MEP.

“I received over 100,000 votes. The Greens are the biggest party in Turku” he says.

Green party chair Pekka Haavisto says “This evening two great victories were won”.

“The Lions’ victory over Canada, and the Euro election victory” he added, noting the men’s national ice hockey team’s World Championship gold.

Election ups and downs 

Sunday’s election also saw mixed fortunes for Finland’s other parties.

The Social Democrats grew their share of the vote by 2.3% to retain their two Brussels MEPs.

The Finns Party could not capitalise on their general election success and only grew their vote by 1%, coming in fourth place overall.

The Centre Party were clearly the biggest losers, dropping 6.1% of the vote from five years ago and losing one MEP. They will now send two new politicians to the European Parliament.

The Left Alliance was also down (2.4%) as were the Swedish People’s Party (-0.4%), and both hang on to their one MEP each; while the Christian Democrats were also down (-0.4%) but don’t get an MEP.