Morning headlines: Thursday 22nd November 2018

News Now Finland morning news headlines and weather first, every weekday at 09:00

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Back to black: why Finnish retailers are expanding their sales

The Black Friday sales event might only have been introduced from America to Finland a few years ago, but now retailers are expanding their promotions to a whole Black Week of offers to tempt consumers to part with their cash. Black Friday, the day after Thanksgiving in the USA, has traditionally been the busiest day of the year for sales, and kicks off the Christmas shopping rush. In Finland, big box store Gigantti reckon they were the first to import the tradition but their rivals Power and Verkkokauppa have been quick to catch up. “Gigantti has done Black Friday since 2015 and I remember that year we were pretty much alone with our adverts. But last year and especially this year lots of retailers and operators have Black Friday campaigns” says Anniina Korpela, Gigantti’s spokesperson. Last year the chain broke records with their sales, and more and more companies are jumping on board with Black Week events. Read more in our original story here.

New study on international business in Finland 

A new report out this morning about how Finland fares as a business destination finds that international employers value Finland’s stability and functionality; employee skills; and employee initiative as positive attributes. The study was commissioned by Amcham Finland and Business Finland and the findings are released today. On the negative side, the study found that labour market, compensation flexibility and labour costs to be some of the things they didn’t like about doing business in Finland.

First female Air Force commander appointed

The Finnish military has appointed its first female Air Force commander. Lieutenant Colonel Inka Niskanen starts work in the new year in charge of Karelia Air Command’s Fighter Squadron 31. Niskanen becomes the highest ranking woman in the Finnish military and will be in charge of up to 25 airgraft when she takes charge at Rissala Air Base near Kuopio. The 44-year old is also Finland’s first (and only) trained Hornet pilot.

‘Crapland’ tourism slammed in UK media

One of Britain’s biggest tabloid newspapers has branded Lapland “Crapland” after tour operators canceled flights to the region over lack of snow. The Sun says 100,000 people from UK are due to fly to Finland for Santa-themed Christmas getaways, but there isn’t any snow forecast until the middle of December. Tour operator Transun has reportedly canceled flights and offered customers alternate dates. Some UK newspapers are reporting there’s been more snow in Britain this year than in Finnish Lapland.

Pleasant politics surprises parliamentarians

Working in politics can be a dirty business, but one Finnish political operator decided to be Mr Nice Guy this week. Dimitri Qvintus, who works as an advisor to Social Democrat leader Antti Rinne wrote tweets about colleagues in parliament from across the political spectrum, saying something nice about each of them. “I had thought that I should say a few nice things about a couple of MPs from other parties that I have had really good cooperation with, and then I just thought also if I say nice things about two or three persons or MPs why wouldn’t I say about a few more? And it was quite easy!” he tells News Now Finland. The response has been positive as well, with politicians and their staff thanking him online, or coming up to thank him for the gesture in person, in the halls of parliament.

Thursday morning weather

It’s  crisp start to Thursday morning and expect a lot of cloud cover first thing. Temperatures are coldest down the western side of the country from -6°C in western Lapland to -5°C in Vaasa this morning. Temperatures stay below freezing across much of the rest of northern, eastern and central Finland, just inching above zero in the south west, Turku, Lahti, Helsinki and the capital city region.

Finnish Meteorological Institute forecast for Thursday 22nd November 2018 / Credit: FMI